Explaining Rape As A Crime

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Rape is forced, undesired sex. Rape, sometimes also known as sexual assault, can happen to both women and men of all ages. Rape is all about power, not sexual intercourse. A rapist uses actual force or violence – or the particular threat of it – to take command over a different person. Some rapists make use of drugs to take away a person’s capability to fight back. Rape is really a criminal offense, whether or not the individual committing it is a stranger, a date, an acquaintance, or a family member. No matter how it took place, rape is frightening and traumatizing. People who have been raped require treatment, comfort, and a way to recover.Rape, sexual attack and sexual abuse are serious and destructive crimes. Sexual violence often causes emotional scars that can last for many years, and fears that, if not tackled, could last for a life time. For most survivors, rape and sexual abuse are a defining moment that splits their life, life before the abuse and life after. The aftermath of any kind of sexual abuse is a challenging and complicated journey. The violence does not conclude with the rape, the sexual abuse, the attack, the insults and the humiliation. Sexual violence keeps reproducing itself in a time which seems endless. It can be confusing how much pain remains after a rape, mostly because the stress imprisons you from within and it’s often misunderstood. Rape, sexual assault and sexual abuse survivors are left feeling vulnerable, angry, tricked, terrified, dishonored, dirty, ashamed and powerless.Acquaintance rape, also referred to as “date rape” or “hidden rape,” has been increasingly recognized as a real and fairly prevalent problem within society. A lot of the attention that’s been focused on this problem has emerged as part of the increasing willingness to recognize and tackle issues related to household violence and the legal rights of women in general in the past three decades. Even if the early and mid 1970’s saw the emergence of education as well as mobilization to fight rape, it wasn’t until the early 80’s that acquaintance rape began to assume a more distinct type within the public consciousness. The scholarly study made by psychologist Mary Koss together with her colleagues is widely recognized as the primary impetus for elevating attention to a brand new level.Getting raped can have a big impact on your life and feelings. You could be annoyed, and you will feel shock, fear, anxiety as well as guilt. You may have an upset stomach or feel nervous. About half of people who are raped say they are depressed sometime in the first year following the attack. It’s important that you keep appointments with your doctor. Make sure to tell her or him regarding any physical, psychological or sexual problems you have during this time period, even if you do not think they are associated with the rape.Be sure to go to your physician 1 or 2 weeks following the rape to evaluate the results of the emergency room tests. Your doctor will give you details and tell you more regarding other support solutions, too. Most of these services include hospital social staff, local rape crisis services, your nearby public health department as well as the state attorney general’s office.