Canon 50D assets video recording through Magic Lantern RAW hack

Canon 50D gains video recording

It may be time to dust off that Canon 50D you purchased aback in 2008. The association abaft the Magic Lantern firmware add-on accept pulled yet addition aerial out the accepted hat (or is it lantern?) by enabling RAW video recording on the APS-C-based DSLR. What’s even added absorbing is that the 50D lacks video abutment out of the box, so this new-found functionality is absolutely magical.

Continue reading Canon 50D assets video recording through Magic Lantern RAW hack

Canon 5D Mark III firmware update, Fix improved AF, HDMI output

Canon 5D Mark III firmware update

If your camera arsenal includes a 5D Mark III, prepare to get your download on. Earlier today, Canon released a major firmware update for the hit DSLR — version 1.2.1 enables clean, uncompressed HDMI output with simultaneous LCD display and recording to CF or SD cards, along with cross-type autofocus for apertures as small as f/8, bringing that aspect of AF capability in line with the EOS-1D X. You’ll be able to take advantage of improved autofocus performance even when using an f/5.6 lens with a 1.4x extender, or an f/4 lens with a 2x extender. On the video front, version 1.2.1 will let you boot an uncompressed YCbCr 4:2:2 feed to an external recorder, enabling your pick of codecs and frame rates, while also eliminating arbitrary limits on record time. The free download, available for recent versions of Mac OS and Windows, Canon 5D Mark III firmware

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Source : engadget

Canon EOS 60D, Let’s Get Creative

THE “SWIRLY FLASH”

It’s no secret that I don’t like to use the built-in flash. The light is harsh and flat, and when you photograph people in a dark setting, such as indoors or at night, it’s too easy to get a background that is dark and underexposed.

So when I’m in a situation in which I have no choice but to use the flash on my camera, I like to change some of the settings to give my snapshots a different look. I drag the shutter, setting it much slower than normal, usually between 1/15 and 1/4 of a second, and spin the camera on axis with the subject while the shutter is open. This keeps the person mostly frozen and well lit while creating an interesting blur of lights in the background (Figure 10.6).

By using a slow shutter speed with the built-in flash, you can create fun and unique photos of your friends.
FIGURE 10.6 By using a slow shutter speed with the built-in flash, you can create fun and unique photos of your friends.

I like to call this technique my “party trick” because when I’m in a room full of people, I’ll use this method to take a quick portrait, and often it’s something that they haven’t seen done before. This technique is not limited to DSLR cameras, and I frequently show people how to set up their point-and-shoot cameras to do it. I find that it adds a unique look to an otherwise boring snapshot. One quick tip: This type of image usually works best when there are a lot of lights behind your subject, such as the lights from a Christmas tree.

CREATING THE “SWIRLY FLASH” EFFECT

  1. Set your camera to Tv mode and start with a shutter speed somewhere between 1/15 and 1/4 of a second.
  2. Press the built-in flash button on the front of your camera.
  3. Point the camera and center your subject in the frame. Start with the camera slightly tilted, and then press the Shutter button to take a photo and spin the camera so that the subject stays centered in the image.
  4. If your flash is too bright, press the Flash Exposure Compensation button on the top of the camera and use the Quick Control dial to move the exposure value (EV) to the left. Take another photo and preview your results.
  5. If the background is too dark or too bright, you’ll want to adjust your ISO setting. The higher the ISO number is, the more ambient light you’ll bring into the background.
  6. If you have too much or too little blur in the background, adjust the shutter speed (a slower shutter speed for more blur, and a faster shutter speed for less blur).
  7. Keep adjusting the settings until you find that “sweet spot.” It will be different for each environment, and there’s no single right way to do it. Just have fun with it!

 

LIGHT PAINTING

Another fun technique that’s worth trying is light painting (Figure 10.7). For this, you’ll need a dark environment (nighttime is best), your camera on a tripod, and some semi-powerful flashlights or another light source. Shine your flashlight on your subject to light it, and in effect you’ll “paint” the light that will show up on your image. But you don’t have to paint the light on something for it to show up—if it’s dark enough you can stand in front of the camera and move the light source to make shapes or spell something out. A fun item to use for this effect is a sparkler (a type of handheld firework that emits sparkles). Just set your camera up on a tripod outdoors at night and have someone run around the frame holding a sparkler, and you’ll create shapes and streaks that can look really cool. You could also use small flashlights or LED lights. In Figure 10.8, I used a small LED flashlight with a green gel over it to add a different color to the writing.

For this photograph, I used a long exposure while my friend scribbled the haystacks with a laser pointer and I “painted” the ground with a powerful LED flashlight. I added small blue and green gels on the flashlight to add color to the image.
FIGURE 10.7 For this photograph, I used a long exposure while my friend scribbled the haystacks with a laser pointer and I “painted” the ground with a powerful LED flashlight. I added small blue and green gels on the flashlight to add color to the image.
I photographed this image with the help of my friend dav.d. That’s me writing with a small LED flashlight. The original photo was backward, so I flipped the image horizontally using editing software.
FIGURE 10.8 I photographed this image with the help of my friend dav.d. That’s me writing with a small LED flashlight. The original photo was backward, so I flipped the image horizontally using editing software.

SETTING UP YOUR CAMERA FOR LIGHT PAINTING

  1. Place your camera on a tripod in a dark environment, preferably nighttime or a darkened room.
  2. If your environment is extremely dark, set your camera to the Bulb shooting mode with a large aperture. If you have some ambient light in your scene, set your camera to Av mode and use an aperture that is large enough to capture the light from your light painting but small enough to give you a fairly slow shutter speed—several seconds is usually a good place to start.
  3. Using a cable release or one of the self-timer drive modes, press the Shutter button. If you are using Bulb mode, you’ll need a cable release in order to hold the shutter open for the duration of your light painting.
  4. With the shutter open, use a flashlight, a sparkler, or any other type of powerful light source to create your image. The creative possibilities are endless!

 

Canon EOS 60D, Tips for Shooting Video

Transitioning from being a still photographer to making movies might seem like a piece of cake, but you’ll find that there are still a few things to keep in mind to make those videos shine.

SEE DIFFERENTLY

When I first started creating videos with my DSLR, I really started to pay attention to the cinematography of TV and movies. I noticed that the camera was usually still while the world around it moved. Subjects moved into the frame and out of the frame, and the camera didn’t always try to follow them. It can be tempting to move the camera to follow your subject, but sometimes keeping still can add more impact and drama to your scene (plus a lot of movement might make your viewers dizzy!). So let your subjects move in and out of the frame while you take a deep breath, relax, and keep your camera pointed in the same, unchanging direction.

DON’T RUSH

As still photographers, we tend to see things “in the moment.” When recording videos those moments last longer, and they need to flow through from one scene to the next. A common mistake that new video photographers tend to make is that they cut their videos short, meaning they stop the recordings too soon. It’s important that you have extra time before and after each scene not only to allow for smooth transitions in and out of the video, but also for editing purposes. It’s always good to have more than you need when piecing video clips together in postproduction.

So, when you think you are done with your video clip and you want to turn it off… don’t! Count to three, or four or five, and then stop your recording. It will feel odd at first, but don’t worry; you’ll get the hang of it. Those extra couple of seconds can make a world of difference.

VIDEO EDITING

Once you have recorded your movies, you might want to do a little bit more with them, such as assemble several video clips into one movie, or add sound or additional graphics and text. If so, you’ll probably want to learn a thing or two about how to edit your videos using video-editing software. Many different software programs are available for you to choose from. With some of the free or inexpensive programs, like iMovie (for Mac) or QuickTime Pro, you can do basic editing on your video clips. Other programs, such as Final Cut Pro or Adobe Premiere Pro, will allow you to do even more advanced editing and to add creative effects to your movies. Using editing software is not required to play back and share movies created with your 60D, but it is a fun way to take your movies to the next level.

 

Canon EOS 60D, Audio

The Canon 60D records audio by utilizing the microphone located on the front of the camera (FIGURE 9.9). It records monaural sound, meaning the sound is recorded on a single channel. This audio basically gets the job done. It’s not top-notch, but if you are making quick, simple movies and don’t need high-quality sound, then this microphone will work quite well for you.

The built-in microphone is located on the front of your camera.
FIGURE 9.9 The built-in microphone is located on the front of your camera.

One huge drawback to using the built-in microphone is that it will pick up operational noises made by your camera. Changing the ISO or manually refocusing your lens during the recording process might not sound loud to your ears, but when you play back the video you’ll hear every click, bump, and swish your camera made during those changes.

If you’re serious about shooting videos and want to ensure that you have the best audio possible to go along with your movies, your best option is to invest in additional audio gear instead of using the built-in microphone (FIGURE 9.10). You can plug in this equipment by using the external microphone IN terminal located on the side of your camera, beneath the Terminal cover. The advantages to using an external microphone and other equipment are that you can record your sound in stereo and you can regain control over the sound recording level. When you have a microphone plugged in, your camera sound will automatically be recorded through that microphone.

The 60D can easily be equipped with external audio gear; here is a simple setup with a BeachTek DXA-SLR active DSLR adapter and Audio-Technica AT875 shotgun microphone.
FIGURE 9.10 The 60D can easily be equipped with external audio gear; here is a simple setup with a BeachTek DXA-SLR active DSLR adapter and Audio-Technica AT875 shotgun microphone.

TURNING OFF THE SOUND RECORDING

TURNING OFF THE SOUND RECORDING

It’s possible, however, that you don’t need to record any audio with your videos. With the 60D you have the option of turning sound recording off so that you are only recording the video. Be sure that you turn the Sound Recording setting back to On when you are finished so you don’t unintentionally record silent movies!

 

 

Canon EOS 60D, Exposure Settings for Video

Setting the exposure for video is similar to setting exposure for still photographs, but you will notice a few differences that will only apply when recording movies. One obvious difference is that you can only view your scene in Live View, and the LCD Monitor will display a simulated exposure for what your video will look like during the recording process. There are also some limitations on shutter speed and exposure—keep on reading to learn more about them.

AUTOEXPOSURE VS. MANUAL EXPOSURE

When shooting movies on the 60D, you have two options for exposure: Auto and Manual. When shooting in Auto, the camera determines all exposure settings (aperture, shutter speed, and ISO), whereas with Manual, you have control over these settings just as you would when shooting still images. Auto is a simple setting to use if you want to get a quick video and don’t have the time to change the settings manually. However, with autoexposure you have limited control, and if you want to take full advantage of your DSLR and lenses when shooting video, you’ll probably want to give the Manual mode a try.

The Manual mode for video functions in the same way as it does for still photography: You pick the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. You can even change your settings while you are recording (although the microphone might pick up camera noises— read more about audio later in this chapter). I prefer to use the Manual mode when shooting video because I like to have control over all of my settings, and I also like to use the largest aperture possible to decrease the depth of field in the scene.

One important thing to note when shooting video is that you have some shutter speed limitations, depending on your frames-per-second setting. The slowest shutter speed when shooting with a frame rate of 50 or 60 fps is 1/60 of a second, and for 24, 25, or 30 fps, you can go down to 1/30 of a second. You can’t go any faster than 1/4000 of a second, but it’s recommended that you keep your shutter speed between 1/30 and 1/125 of a second, especially when photographing a moving subject. The slower your shutter speed is, the smoother and less choppy the movement in your video will be.

CHANGING THE MOVIE EXPOSURE SETTING

CHANGING THE MOVIE EXPOSURE SETTING

  1. Set the camera to video mode using the Mode dial on the top of the camera.
  2. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to get to the first menu tab, and then select the Movie Exposure option at the top (A). Press the Set button.
  3. Make your selection (Auto or Manual), and then press the Set button once again to lock in your changes (B).

WHITE BALANCE AND PICTURE STYLES

When shooting video, you want to be sure to get the white balance right. Remember the difference between RAW and JPEG. Well, think of a video file as a JPEG. If you were to edit the video file on your computer, it would be difficult to change the white balance without damaging the pixels, and if the white balance is completely off, you might not even be able to salvage the video’s original colors.

What’s neat about shooting video is that you can see what the video quality will be like before you start recording. This means that you can set the white balance and see it changing right in front of you

Picture styles are also a very useful tool when shooting video. They work the same way as with still photography and you can preview your scene with the changes while in the video Live View mode. Just remember that once you record in one of these settings, you can’t change this quality of the video. For example, when using the Monochrome (black and white) picture style, once you’ve recorded a movie, there is no way to go back and retrieve the color information.

 

 

Canon 7D, Let’s Get Creative

To fi nish off this chapter, I’m going to give you a few more shooting tips, mostly fun ways you can play around with light to get some really neat results. Photography wouldn’t have as much appeal to me if it weren’t for all the exciting ways to use light, along with the different settings on my camera. These are just a few of the hundreds of ways you can experiment with your camera.

THE “SWIRLY FLASH”

It’s no secret that I don’t like to use the built-in fl ash. The light is harsh and fl at, and when you photograph people in a dark setting, such as indoors or at night, it’s too easy to get a background that is dark and underexposed.

So when I’m in a situation in which I have no choice but to use the fl ash on my camera, I like to change some of the settings to give my snapshots a different look. I drag the shutter, setting it much slower than normal, usually between 1/15 and 1/4 of a second, and spin the camera on axis with the subject while the shutter is open. This keeps the person mostly frozen and well-lit while creating an interesting blur of lights in the background (Figure 10.2).

By using a slow shutter speed with the built-in fl ash, you can create fun and unique photos of your friends.
FIGURE 10.2 By using a slow shutter speed with the built-in fl ash, you can create fun and unique photos of your friends.

I like to call this technique my “party trick” because when I’m in a room full of people, I’ll use this method to take a quick portrait, and often it’s something that they haven’t seen done before. This technique is not limited to DSLR cameras, and I frequently show people how to set up their point-and-shoot cameras to do it. I fi nd that it adds a unique look to an otherwise boring snapshot. One quick tip: This type of image usually works best when there are a lot of lights behind your subject, such as the lights from a Christmas tree.

CREATING THE “SWIRLY FLASH” EFFECT

  1. Set your camera to Tv mode and start with a shutter speed somewhere between 1/15 and 1/4 of a second.
  2. Press the built-in fl ash button on the front of your camera.
  3. Point the camera and center your subject in the frame. Start with the camera slightly tilted, and then press the Shutter button to take a photo and spin the camera so that the subject stays centered in the image.
  4. If your fl ash is too bright, press the Flash Exposure Compensation button on the top of the camera and use the Quick Control dial to move the exposure value (EV) to the left. Take another photo and preview your results.
  5. If the background is too dark or too bright, you’ll want to adjust your ISO setting. The higher the ISO number is, the more ambient light you’ll bring into the background.
  6. If you have too much or too little blur in the background, adjust the shutter speed (a slower shutter speed for more blur, and a faster shutter speed for less blur).
  7. Keep adjusting the settings until you fi nd that “sweet spot.” It will be different for each environment, and there’s no single right way to do it. Just have fun with it!

LIGHT PAINTING

Another fun technique that’s worth trying is light painting (Figure 10.3). For this, you’ll need a dark environment (nighttime is best), your camera on a tripod, and some semi-powerful fl ashlights or other light source. Shine your fl ashlight on your subject to light it, and in effect you’ll “paint” the light that will show up on your image.

But you don’t have to paint the light on something for it to show up—if it’s dark enough you can stand in front of the camera and move the light source to make shapes or spell something out. A fun item to use for this effect is a sparkler (a type of handheld fi rework that emits sparkles)—just set your camera up on a tripod outdoors at night and have someone run around the frame holding a sparkler, and you’ll create shapes and streaks that can look really cool. You could also use small fl ashlights or LED lights. In Figure 10.4 I used a small LED fl ashlight with a green gel over it to add a different color to the writing.

For this photograph, I used a long exposure while my friend scribbled the haystacks with a laser pointer and I “painted” the ground with a powerful LED fl ashlight. I added small blue and green gels on the fl ashlight to add color to the image.
FIGURE 10.3 For this photograph, I used a long exposure while my friend scribbled the haystacks with a laser pointer and I “painted” the ground with a powerful LED fl ashlight. I added small blue and green gels on the fl ashlight to add color to the image.
I photographed this image with the help of my friend dav.d. That’s me writing with a small LED fl ashlight. The original photo was backwards, so I fl ipped the image horizontally using editing software.
FIGURE 10.4 I photographed this image with the help of my friend dav.d. That’s me writing with a small LED fl ashlight. The original photo was backwards, so I fl ipped the image horizontally using editing software.

SETTING UP YOUR CAMERA FOR LIGHT PAINTING

  1. Place your camera on a tripod in a dark environment, preferably nighttime or a darkened room.
  2. If your environment is extremely dark, set your camera to the Bulb shooting mode with a large aperture. If you have some ambient light in your scene, set your camera to Av mode and use an aperture that is large enough to capture the light from your light painting but small enough to give you a fairly slow shutter speed—several seconds is usually a good place to start.
  3. Using a cable release or one of the self-timer drive modes, press the Shutter button. If you are using Bulb mode, you’ll need a cable release in order to hold the shutter open for the duration of your light painting.
  4. With the shutter open, use a fl ashlight, a sparkler, or any other type of powerful light source to create your image. The creative possibilities are endless!

HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE (HDR)

how to use HDR for landscape photography. But HDR doesn’t need to be limited to landscapes. In fact, you can photograph almost anything that is not moving and achieve some great effects. Figure 10.5 is the interior of a library photographed just before noon. The light shining through the windows added contrast to the scene, but by creating an HDR image, I was able to retain a lot of detail in both the highlight and shadow areas of the image.

This is an HDR image of the interior of a building. Notice that you can still see details in the shaded and sun-fi lled areas of the scene.
FIGURE 10.5 This is an HDR image of the interior of a building. Notice that you can still see details in the shaded and sun-fi lled areas of the scene.

 

Canon 7D, Tips for Shooting Video

Transitioning from being a still photographer to making movies might seem like a piece of cake, but you’ll fi nd that there are still a few things to keep in mind to make those videos shine.

SEE DIFFERENTLY

When I fi rst started creating videos with my DSLR, I really started to pay attention to the cinematography of TV and movies. I noticed that the camera was usually still while the world around it moved. Subjects moved into the frame and out of the frame, and the camera didn’t always try to follow them. It can be tempting to move the camera to follow your subject, but sometimes keeping still can add more impact and drama to your scene (plus a lot of movement might make your viewers dizzy!). So let your subjects move in and out of the frame while you take a deep breath, relax, and keep your camera pointed in the same, unchanging direction.

DON’T RUSH

As still photographers, we tend to see things “in the moment.” When recording videos those moments last longer, and they need to fl ow through from one scene to the next. A common mistake that new video photographers tend to make is that they cut their videos short, meaning they stop the recordings too soon. It’s important that you have extra time before and after each scene not only to allow for smooth transitions in and out of the video, but also for editing purposes. It’s always good to have more than you need when piecing video clips together in postproduction.

So, when you think you are done with your video clip and you want to turn it off… don’t! Count to three, or four or fi ve, and then stop your recording. It will feel odd at fi rst, but don’t worry; you’ll get the hang of it. Those extra couple of seconds can make a world of difference.

VIDEO EDITING

Once you have recorded your movies, you might want to do a little bit more with them, such as assemble several video clips into one movie, or add sound or additional graphics and text. If so you’ll probably want to learn a thing or two about how to edit your videos using video editing software. Many different software programs are available for you to choose from. With some of the free or inexpensive programs, like iMovie (for Macs) or QuickTime Pro, you can do basic editing on your video clips. Other programs, such as Final Cut Pro or Adobe Premier Pro, will allow you to do even more advanced editing and to add creative effects to your movies. Using editing software is not required to play back and share movies created with your 7D, but it is a fun way to take your movies to the next level.

 

Canon 7D, Audio

The Canon 7D records audio by utilizing the microphone located on the front of the camera (Figure 9.11). It records monaural sound, meaning the sound is recorded on a single channel. This audio basically gets the job done. It’s not top-notch, but if you are making quick, simple movies and don’t need high-quality sound, then this microphone will work quite well for you.

One huge drawback to using the built-in microphone is that it will pick up operational noises made by your camera. Changing the ISO or manually refocusing your lens during the recording process might not sound loud to your ears, but when you play back the video you’ll hear every click, bump, and swish your camera made during those changes.

If you’re serious about shooting videos and want to ensure that you have the best audio possible to go along with your movies, your best option is to invest in additional audio gear instead of using the built-in microphone (Figure 9.12). You can plug in this equipment by using the external microphone IN terminal located on the side of your camera, beneath the Terminal cover. The advantages to using an external microphone and other equipment are that you can record your sound in stereo and you can regain control over the sound recording level.

The 7D can easily be equipped with external audio gear; here is a simple setup with a BeachTek DXA-SLR active DSLR adapter and Audio-Technica AT875 shotgun microphone.
FIGURE 9.12 The 7D can easily be equipped with external audio gear; here is a simple setup with a BeachTek DXA-SLR active DSLR adapter and Audio-Technica AT875 shotgun microphone.

TURNING OFF THE SOUND RECORDING

TURNING OFF THE SOUND RECORDING

  1. Set the camera to video mode using the Movie shooting switch. This feature is only changeable when in video mode.
  2. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to get to the fourth camera tab. Use the Quick Control dial to scroll down to Sound Recording, and press Set (A).
  3. Using the Quick Control dial once again, select Off (B). Press the Set button to lock in your change.
  4. Press the Menu button to go back into Movie shooting mode.

 

Canon 7D, Exposure Settings for Video

Setting the exposure for video is similar to setting exposure for still photographs, but you will notice a few differences that will only apply when recording movies. One obvious difference is that you can only view your scene in Live View, and the LCD Monitor will display a simulated exposure for what your video will look like during the recording process. You’ll know it’s working properly when you see the exposure simulation icon displayed in white on the Information Display (Figure 9.4). There are also some limitations on shutter speed and exposure— keep on reading to learn more about them.

 In video mode you will see a simulated exposure that is similar to what you will actually record.
FIGURE 9.4 In video mode you will see a simulated exposure that is similar to what you will actually record.

AUTOEXPOSURE VS. MANUAL EXPOSURE

As with other types of photography, we have the option to shoot in auto or Manual mode (M), but with video the settings are a bit different. When using a shooting mode other than M (such as P, Tv, Av, and the Full Auto modes) the camera determines its exposure settings by using autoexposure. You have no control over the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. This is a simple setting to use if you want to get a quick video and don’t have the time to change the settings manually. However, with autoexposure you have limited control, and if you want to take full advantage of your DSLR and lenses when shooting video, you’ll probably want to give the Manual mode a try.

The Manual mode for video functions in the same way as it does for still photography: You pick the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. You can even change your settings while you are recording (although the microphone might pick up camera noises—read more about audio later in this chapter). I prefer to use the Manual mode when shooting video because I like to be in control over all of my settings, and I also like to use the largest aperture possible to decrease the depth of fi eld in the scene.

One important thing to note when shooting video is that you have some shutter speed limitations, depending on your frames-per-second setting. The slowest shutter speed when shooting with a frame rate of 50 or 60 fps is 1/60 of a second, and for 24, 25, or 30 fps you can go down to 1/30 of a second. You can’t go any faster than 1/4000 of a second, but it’s recommended that you keep your shutter speed between 1/30 and 1/125 of a second, especially when photographing a moving subject. The slower your shutter speed is, the smoother and less choppy the movement in your video will be.

WHITE BALANCE AND PICTURE STYLES

if you were to edit the video fi le on your computer, it would be diffi cult to change the white balance without damaging the pixels, and if the white balance is completely off, you might not even be able to salvage the video’s original colors.

What’s neat about shooting video is that you can see what the video quality will be like before you start recording. This means that you can set the white balance and see it changing right in front of you

Picture styles are also a very useful tool when shooting video. They work the same way as with still photography, and you can preview your scene with the changes while in the video Live View mode. Just remember that once you record in one of these settings, you can’t change this quality of the video. For example, when using the Monochrome (black and white) Picture Style, once you’ve recorded a movie, there is no way to go back and retrieve the color information.