Nikon D7000, Sound

The D7000 can record audio to go along with your video, but there are a couple of things to keep in mind while using the built-in microphone. The first is to make sure you don’t block the microphone. If you look closely at the front of the camera body, you’ll notice three small holes right below the silver D7000 nameplate, located above the lens release button.

The next thing you need to know about sound is that it is mono, not stereo. This is lower quality sound than you are used to hearing in movies and music. To get stereo quality audio you will need to use an external microphone. I use a Rode shotgun microphone (Figure 10.2) that mounts to the camera’s hot shoe and plugs into the stereo audio jack. These mics do a very nice job of recording audio for your videos and are one of the least expensive options.

The Rode shotgun microphone
Figure 10.2 The Rode shotgun microphone mounts to the camera’s hot shoe and plugs into the stereo audio jack for recording high-quality sound.

Turning off the sound

Sometimes you may wish to turn the sound off altogether—maybe sound would be distracting or you plan on adding your own soundtrack later. This comes in handy when I add the Chariots of Fire soundtrack to my daughter’s cross-country videos.

To turn off sound

  1. Following the directions for setting the movie quality above, locate the Movie Settings menu and press OK.
  2. Highlight Microphone and press OK again (A).
  3. Select the Microphone Off option and press OK to lock in the change (B).
  4. Press the Menu button twice or the Live View switch to return to shooting mode.

turn off sound

Nikon D7000, Video Quality

The best quality your D7000 is capable of is high-definition video with a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels, aka 1080p. The 1080 represents the height of the video image in pixels, and the P stands for progressive, which is the method the camera uses to draw the video on the screen (more on this later). You can select a lower resolution video depending on your needs.

The other two video resolutions are 1280 x 720 and 640 x 424 (standard definition). For high-definition television and computer/media station viewing, you will be best served by using 1920 x 1080. If you plan on recording for the Internet or portable media devices, first check the appropriate upload to that medium or device. Many social sites such as YouTube and Facebook support HD video, as do the iPad, iPod touch, and competing devices. But before you decide to render HD video you should know the key benefit of using the lower resolutions: Lower resolution video requires less physical storage due to a smaller pixel count. This means you can fit more video on the storage card, as well as take less time to upload the video to the Internet.

What’s the difference between 1080p and 1080i?

When it comes to video, two terms describe its quality and how it is captured and displayed on a monitor or screen: progressive and interlaced. Unlike a photo, a video frame is not displayed all at once but instead is drawn sequentially. Interlaced video first draws the odd-numbered lines and then the even-numbered lines. This odd-even drawing is what we sometimes call screen flicker. In progressive video, the type your D7000 produces, the lines are drawn in sequence from top to bottom, usually resulting in better image quality and less screen flicker. For viewing purposes progressive video is preferred, especially with higher definition images.

Setting Movie Quality

Setting Movie Quality

Setting Movie Quality

  1. Start by pressing the Menu button. Using your Multi-selector, navigate to the Shooting menu.
  2. Using the Multi-selector, highlight Movie Settings and press OK (A).
  3. Highlight Movie Quality and press OK (B).
  4. Select the video quality of your choice and press OK (C).
  5. Press the Menu button twice to exit Menu mode and return to shooting, or rotate the Live View switch to the right to jump to the Live View/Movie mode.

 

Nikon D7000, Dedicating a Second Card to Video

I’m not a huge fan of having all my video and photos on one SD card because often I’m using two different programs for editing: one for video and one for photos. It’s just easier for importing to have one card dedicated to photos and the other to video. Plus, it allows me to dedicate my fastest SD card to video.

To dedicate a video card

dedicate a video card

dedicate a video card

  1. To assign your video recording to a specific SD card slot, press the Menu button. Use the Multi-selector to highlight Movie Settings, under the Shooting Menu and click OK (A).
  2. Use your Multi-selector to highlight Destination and click OK (B).
  3. Select your desired SD card slot, and press OK (C).
  4. Click the Menu button twice or simply rotate the Live View switch to turn on Live View/ Movie Mode.

 

Nikon D7000, Recording with Live View

Video recording is a feature of the Live View capabilities of the camera, so you’ll have to put it into active Live View mode to begin capturing video. This is done by rotating the Live View switch to the right, which will activate Live View on the rear display (Figure 10.1).

Next, you need to focus the camera by placing the red focus box on the subject and holding down the shutter button halfway until the focusing box turns green, indicating your subject is in focus. New to your D7000 is its ability to continue focusing on your subject when you simply keep the shutter button pressed down halfway. (Pressing the shutter button down all the way will take a photo as usual, so make sure to press the shutter only halfway when making movies.)

Rotate the Live View switch
Figure 10.1 Rotate the Live View switch to the right to activate Live View.

Once your subject is in focus, you can push the red button located on the Live View switch to begin recording. As the camera begins to record, you will notice a few new icons on the LCD. At the top left is a blinking red Record icon to let you know that the camera is in active recording mode. At the upper right, a timer counts down your remaining recording time. The recording time is directly related to the quality of video you have selected as well as the capacity of your memory card. Lower quality video and larger memory cards equal more recording time. To stop recording, simply press the red button on the Live View switch a second time, which takes you back to Live View mode. To turn off Live View, rotate the Live View switch to the right, the same way you turned it on, or simply turn off the camera.

Hold it steady

I know a lot of people are just going to start shooting video right out of the box without adjusting the settings, so before I move on I have one word of advice: Use a tripod. Have you ever felt like you just finished riding the Cyclone at Coney Island after watching a home video? Handheld video is rough to watch unless the person behind the camera knew what he or she was doing. Buy a tripod or a tripod head that is constructed for video. Typically these tripods will have what’s called fluid, smooth, or shake-free panning and tilt features. Trust me, a good investment in a nice tripod for your video will make the difference between professional-looking video and The Blair Witch Project.

 

Canon EOS 60D, Picture Styles

Picture styles on the 60D will allow you to enhance your images in-camera depending on the type of photo you are taking. The picture style is automatically selected when you are using any of the Basic Zone modes. When using a Creative Zone shooting mode, you decide which style to use.

There are a few things to keep in mind when using picture styles. The first is that when you are shooting in RAW, the picture style doesn’t really “stick.” When previewing your images on the LCD Monitor, you’ll see it applied to the image; but once you bring it into your RAW editing software, you can change it to any of the other styles. Shooting JPEG images or video, however, will permanently embed the picture style to the image or movie and can’t be changed. This is extremely important to keep in mind when using styles such as the Monochrome picture style, since you will be discarding all color from your image.

These styles can be applied in the menu, while shooting in Live View, or while editing your RAW images in-camera. There are six styles to choose from, along with three additional user-defined styles:

  • Standard: This general-purpose style is used to create crisp images with bold, vibrant colors. It is suitable for most scenes.
  • Portrait: This style enhances the colors in skin tone, and is used for a softerlooking image.
  • Landscape: This style enhances blues and greens, two colors that are typically visible in a landscape image.
  • Neutral: This style creates natural colors and subdued images, and it is a good choice if you want to do a lot of editing to your photos on the computer.
  • Faithful: This picture style is similar to the neutral style but creates better color when shooting in daylight-balanced light (color temperature of 5200K). It’s also a good option if you prefer to edit your photos on the computer.
  • Monochrome: This style creates black and white images. It’s important to note that if you use the Monochrome style and shoot in JPEG, you cannot revert the image to color.

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE IN THE ME

  1. Press the Menu button on the back of the camera, and then use the Multi- Controller to get to the second menu tab.
  2. Using the Quick Control dial, scroll down to the Picture Style menu item. Press the Set button.
  3. Use either the Main dial or the Quick Control dial to scroll through the styles. When you’ve selected the one you want to use, press the Set button.
  4. To edit any of these styles, select the one you want to change, and then press the Info button. To edit a specific setting, select the setting, press Set, and then use the Quick Control dial to make the changes.

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE WITH LIVE VIEW

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE WITH LIVE VIEW

  1. Press the Live View shooting button to get into the Live View shooting mode.
  2. With Live View activated, press the Quick Control button on the back of the camera, and then use the Multi- Controller to scroll down to the Picture Style icon. Press Set.
  3. Use the Main dial on the top of the camera to select from among the different base picture style choices (A).
  4. Once you’ve selected a picture style, you can change any of its four parameters by using the Multi-Controller or Quick Control dial to select them (sharpness, contrast, saturation, and color tone), and then use the Main dial to make the changes (B).
  5. Press the Set button to lock in your changes.

 

Canon EOS 60D, In-Camera Image Editing

The 60D has image-editing features that allow you to quickly process images in-camera and save those files as a JPEG on your SD card. This feature is not a replacement for editing images on your computer, but it is a useful and fun way to create quick, ready-to-use images directly from your memory card.

CREATIVE FILTERS

The Creative filters are a fun way to add different effects to your images. The 60D comes with four different filters, each with settings you can change to customize the look of your image. Now, one thing to note is that you are unable to apply these effects to images photographed in the mRAW or sRAW quality settings.

  • Grainy B/W: This will make the image black and white and also add grain to the image. You can control the amount of contrast in the image—the contrast setting in Figure 10.2 was set to “low.”
  • Soft Focus: This adds a classic “soft glow” to an image by adding blur (Figure 10.3). You have control over the amount of blur you would like to add to your image.
  • Toy Camera effect: This effect adds a color cast and also vignettes the corners of the image to make it look as though it was photographed with a toy camera (Figure 10.4).
  • Miniature effect: If you want to mimic the look of a tilt-shift lens, then this is really fun to use. This filter adds contrast and blur to the image to make your scene look like a diorama, and it allows you to select the area of focus. It looks best when applied to photos taken from high up, like from a cliff or balcony (Figure 10.5).
Grainy B/W
FIGURE 10.2 Grainy B/W
Soft Focus
FIGURE 10.3 Soft Focus
Toy Camera effect
FIGURE 10.4 Toy Camera effect
Miniature effect
FIGURE 10.5 Miniature effect

APPLYING A CREATIVE FILTER TO AN IMAGE

APPLYING A CREATIVE FILTER TO AN IMAGE

  1. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to go to the fifth tab from the left. Scroll down to the Creative Filters option using the Quick Control dial and press Set (A).
  2. Use the Quick Control dial to select an image to edit (your camera will only display compatible images at this point). Press the Set button.
  3. Use the Quick Control dial to select the Creative filter you would like to apply, and then press Set (B).
  4. Use the Quick Control dial to adjust the filter (the options are different for each filter) (C). When you are finished editing, press the Set button. (You can also exit any of the filters at any time by pressing the Menu button to go to the previous screen.)
  5. Select OK on the next screen, and your image is now saved as a JPEG on your memory card. Press OK to confirm, and press the Menu button to exit.

RAW PROCESSING

Along with the Creative filters, you can also do basic adjustments to RAW files on your 60D. This feature is helpful if you need to quickly edit a file and save it as a JPEG, and you don’t have access or time to do so on a computer. Just like with the Creative filters, you cannot process images photographed in the mRAW and sRAW quality settings.

PROCESSING RAW IMAGES WITH THE 60D

PROCESSING RAW IMAGES WITH THE 60D

  1. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to go to the fifth tab from the left. Scroll down to the RAW Image Processing option using the Quick Control dial, and press Set (A).
  2. Use the Quick Control dial to select an image to edit (your camera will only display compatible images at this point). Press the Set button.
  3. Use the Multi-Controller to select an option to edit. Then use the Quick Control dial to make changes.
  4. Continue making changes to each setting as necessary, and when you are finished processing the image, scroll down to the Save option (B). Press Set.
  5. Select OK on the next screen, and your image is now saved as a JPEG on your memory card. Press OK to confirm, and press the Menu button to exit.

RESIZING IMAGES

Sometimes you might want to quickly resize an image, and the 60D has a feature that makes this very easy. You can resize JPEG L/M/S1 and S2 images, but not RAW and JPEG S3 files. This feature is perfect if you edited an image using a Creative filter discussed earlier in this section and need to use the image on the Web or send it as an email attachment.

RESIZING IMAGES ON THE 60D

RESIZING IMAGES ON THE 60D

  1. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to go to the fifth tab from the left. Scroll down to the Resize option using the Quick Control dial and press Set (A).
  2. Use the Quick Control dial to select an image to resize (your camera will only display compatible images at this point). Press the Set button.
  3. Use the Quick Control dial to select the size you would like your image to be, and then press the Set button (B).
  4. Select OK on the next screen, and your image is now saved as a JPEG on your memory card. Press OK to confirm, and press the Menu button to exit.

 

VARI-ANGLE LCD MONITOR

One really cool feature of the 60D is its Vari-angle LCD Monitor (commonly called an “articulating screen”), which can be really handy in certain situations. Benefits of using this feature are very apparent when shooting in Live View or video mode, since you can angle the display so that it’s shaded from the sun. You can also angle the display when you want to lower or raise the camera beyond your field of view by moving the LCD Monitor so that it’s always facing in your direction. You can also swivel the display so that it’s flipped completely around, making it possible to do self-portraits or videos of yourself.

Another nice benefit of the Vari-angle LCD Monitor is that you can turn the display so that it’s flush against the camera, protecting the LCD Monitor from scratches while not in use. This is a good option when packing the camera in a camera bag or while using it in a harsh environment where damage to the monitor can easily occur.

VARI-ANGLE LCD MONITOR

Canon EOS 60D, Focusing

Focusing for video is a little bit different than still-image focusing, since you can’t look through the viewfinder to set focus, and all of it is done on the Live View screen. However, some things are the same—just like with still photography, you can either manually focus or autofocus your lens. (It’s important to note, however, that your camera will not autofocus during actual video recording, so any changes you would like to make while shooting must be done manually.)

The 60D makes it easy to autofocus and gives you three different settings to choose from:

  • Live Mode : With Live mode, the image sensor is used to focus. This method can take longer than focusing through the viewfinder (which uses the dedicated AF sensor).
  • Face detection Live mode : This is the same as Live mode focusing, but it detects and focuses human faces.
  • Quick mode : With this setting, the dedicated AF sensor is used to set the focus; however, the Live View image is momentarily interrupted for this to take place. This is the fastest method of focusing when in Live View or video mode.

To use these focusing modes, just point the camera at your subject, use the Multi- Controller to select your focus point, and press the Shutter button down halfway. The focus point will flash green and you’ll hear a beep when the camera finds the focus.

Using autofocus is easy, but if you ask me, the best way to set focus in Live View or video mode is to manually focus the lens. I actually find it to be much quicker and more accurate than relying on the camera’s autofocus. The great thing about setting focus using the LCD Monitor on the back of the camera is the ability to zoom in to your subject. This feature allows you to compose your shot and use the same buttons you would use to preview your images at 100 percent in Playback mode, but in Live View you are viewing the subject that you are about to photograph or record.

MANUALLY FOCUSING YOUR VIDEOS

MANUALLY FOCUSING YOUR VIDEOS

  1. Set the camera to video mode using the Mode dial on the top of the camera.
  2. Use the Multi-Controller to select the area you want to focus on (A). When you have it set, press the Magnify button once to zoom in (B). Pressing it once will magnify your image by a factor of 5 (5x), and pressing it twice will magnify it by a factor of 10 (10x).
  3. Set the focusing switch on your lens to MF, and then turn the front part of the lens until your image is in focus.
  4. Press the Magnify button until the image on the LCD Monitor is back to Normal view.

LIVE VIEW

As you may have already guessed, many of the techniques used in this chapter to set focus and exposure for recording videos can also be applied to shooting still images in Live View mode.

 

Canon EOS 60D, Composition

When creating movies, most of the same rules of composition you use with still photography apply. The rule of thirds is one important rule to keep in mind when shooting video. The 60D’s grid overlay feature places a grid over the LCD Monitor to help you frame your shot properly. Changes to this menu item will apply to both Live View and videorecording modes.(FIGURE 9.4)

You can set your camera to display a grid overlay on the LCD Monitor in video mode and Live View.
FIGURE 9.4 You can set your camera to display a grid overlay on the LCD Monitor in video mode and Live View.

SETTING THE GRID DISPLAY FOR VIDEO RECORDING

SETTING THE GRID DISPLAY FOR VIDEO RECORDING

  1. Set the camera to video mode using the Mode dial on the top of the camera.
  2. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to get to the second camera tab. Use the Quick Control dial to scroll down to Grid Display and press Set (A).
  3. Using the Quick Control dial, select the grid of your choice (B). Press the Set button to lock in your change.
  4. Press the Menu button to go back into Movie shooting mode. You will now see a semitransparent grid over the LCD Monitor on the back of your camera.

Quick Control dial

When you are in video mode, you will notice a semitransparent mask covering parts of the LCD Monitor (FIGURE 9.5 and FIGURE 9.6). The space within the mask is the area that will be recorded; the semitransparent mask on either the top and bottom (HD) or left and right (SD) will not be recorded. This is extremely helpful when composing images for movies, because you will know where the edges of the frame will be.

In HD resolutions (720p and 1080p), your camera will display a semitransparent mask over the top and bottom portions of your LCD Monitor.
FIGURE 9.5 In HD resolutions (720p and 1080p), your camera will display a semitransparent mask over the top and bottom portions of your LCD Monitor.
n SD resolution (640 x 480), your camera will display a semitransparent mask over the left and right portions of your LCD Monitor.
FIGURE 9.6 In SD resolution (640 x 480), your camera will display a semitransparent mask over the left and right portions of your LCD Monitor.

If you place your camera on a tripod to record your movies, one very useful feature is the electronic level, “Landscape Photography” (FIGURE 9.7). It can sometimes be difficult to see the horizon line in your scene, and the electronic level will help you keep your camera leveled horizontally. With still photography you can always go in and straighten the photo in editing software, but with video you don’t have as much wiggle room, so it’s always best to get it correct in-camera. Note that if you set the autofocus mode to “Face detection Live mode,” the electronic level won’t appear. Be sure to set it to either “Live mode” or “Quick mode” for it to show (please read the next section for more information on focus settings for video recording).

The electronic level is a helpful feature to use when placing your camera on a tripod.
FIGURE 9.7 The electronic level is a helpful feature to use when placing your camera on a tripod.

USING A TRIPOD

To get the best-possible quality when recording video with your camera, it’s a good idea to have a sturdy tripod and a fluid video head. I use a Manfrotto 501HDV video head with my Canon 60D when I use it on a tripod (Figure 9.8). There are also other options for stabilizing your camera, including handheld rigs and additional equipment.

A sturdy tripod and a fluid video head are good tools to have when shooting video with your 60D.
FIGURE 9.8 A sturdy tripod and a fluid video head are good tools to have when shooting video with your 60D.

 

 

Nikon D7000, Directing the Viewer’s Eye: A Word About Composition

As a photographer, it’s your job to lead the viewer through your image. You accomplish this by using the principles of composition, which is the arrangement of elements in the scene that draws the viewer’s eyes through your image and holds his attention. You need to understand how people see and then use that information to focus their attention on the most important elements in your image.

There is a general order in which we look at elements in a photograph. The first is brightness. The eye wants to travel to the brightest object within a scene. So if you have a bright sky, it’s probably the first place the eye will go. The second is sharpness. Sharp, detailed elements get more attention than soft, blurry areas. Finally, the eye will move to vivid colors while leaving the dull, flat colors for last. It is important to know these essentials in order to grab—and keep—the viewer’s attention and then direct him through the frame.

In Figure 7.15, the eye is drawn to the bright splashes of water and the sharply focused rocks in the foreground. From there it is pulled up the river, where the frame gets darker and the eyes come to rest on the mountains and the shore. Finally, they move up into the active sky, starting with the light fluffy clouds and ending in the dark blue at the very top of the frame.

I enjoy fly-fishing the Madison River in Montana so much that I decided to photograph my favorite trout stream. Standing in the water with my waders on, I took this shot of the river. When composing it I wanted the viewer’s eye to be drawn into the image and pulled up to the mountains and the wispy clouds above.
Figure 7.15 I enjoy fly-fishing the Madison River in Montana so much that I decided to photograph my favorite trout stream. Standing in the water with my waders on, I took this shot of the river. When composing it I wanted the viewer’s eye to be drawn into the image and pulled up to the mountains and the wispy clouds above.

Rule of thirds

There are quite a few philosophies concerning composition. The easiest to begin with is the “rule of thirds.” Using this principle, you simply divide your viewfinder into thirds by imagining two horizontal and two vertical lines that divide the frame equally.

The key to using this method of composition is to have your main subject located at or near one of the intersecting points (Figure 7.16).

I wanted to show all the dead trees in the paint pot at Yellowstone National Park, so I decided to compose the image with the nearest tree in the bottom right quadrant. This created a more compelling composition than centering the tree.
Figure 7.16 I wanted to show all the dead trees in the paint pot at Yellowstone National Park, so I decided to compose the image with the nearest tree in the bottom right quadrant. This created a more compelling composition than centering the tree.

By placing your subject near these intersecting lines, you are giving the viewer space to move within the frame. The one thing you normally don’t want to do is put your subject smack-dab in the middle of the frame, sometimes referred to as “bull’s-eye” composition. Centering the subject is not always wrong, but it will usually be less appealing and may not hold the viewer’s attention.

Speaking of the middle of the frame: Another rule of thirds deals with horizon lines. Generally speaking, you should position the horizon one-third of the way up or down in the frame. Splitting the frame in half by placing your horizon in the middle of the picture is akin to placing the subject in the middle of the frame; it doesn’t lend a sense of importance to either the sky or the ground.

In Figure 7.17, I incorporated the rule of thirds by aligning my horizon in the bottom third of the frame and the sky and steam in the top third. I also placed the river in the foreground to draw the eye to the bottom third of the frame, giving the viewer a chance to travel throughout the frame, ending on the steam, sky, and bright sun. The top two thirds contain the sky and the steam rising from the geothermal features in Yellowstone National Park.

 Putting the horizon of this image at the bottom third of the frame places emphasis on steam rising from the geothermal features in the landscape.
Figure 7.17 Putting the horizon of this image at the bottom third of the frame places emphasis on steam rising from the geothermal features in the landscape.

The D7000 has two visual tools for assisting you in composing your photo in the form of grid overlays. These grids can be set to appear in the viewfinder and on the rear LCD when in Live View mode.

Using a grid overlay in the viewfinder

Using a grid overlay in the viewfinder

  1. Press the Menu button, then use the Multi-selector to navigate to the Custom Settings menu and select D Shooting/Display.
  2. Navigate to D2 Viewfinder Grid Display, press OK, set the feature to On, and press OK.

Using a grid overlay in Live View

  1. Rotate the Live View switch to turn on Live View.
  2. Press the Info button until the grid appears on the viewfinder.

Although the grid in the viewfinder and the Live View screen aren’t equally divided into thirds, they will give you an approximation of where you should be aligning your subjects in the frame.

Creating depth

Because a photograph is a flat, two-dimensional space, you need to establish a sense of depth by using the elements in the scene to create a three-dimensional feel. This is accomplished by including different and distinct spaces for the eye to travel to: a foreground, middle ground, and background. By using these three spaces, you draw the viewer in and give your image depth.

This scene of the Badlands National Park in South Dakota, Figure 7.18, illustrates this well. The hills in the foreground as well as my point of view helped create a sense of height. The faraway, flat horizon seems miles away, while the sunlight beaming through hit the small rock outcropping right in the center of the frame. All of these factors helped give the image depth and made it feel three-dimensional.

I was visiting the Badlands on a stormy day. There was a break in the clouds where the sunlight was coming through and shining on a small rock outcropping in the distance. The rain increased the colors in the striations of the rock, adding contrast and visual interest.
Figure 7.18 I was visiting the Badlands on a stormy day. There was a break in the clouds where the sunlight was coming through and shining on a small rock outcropping in the distance. The rain increased the colors in the striations of the rock, adding contrast and visual interest.

Canon EOS 60D, Exposure Settings for Video

Setting the exposure for video is similar to setting exposure for still photographs, but you will notice a few differences that will only apply when recording movies. One obvious difference is that you can only view your scene in Live View, and the LCD Monitor will display a simulated exposure for what your video will look like during the recording process. There are also some limitations on shutter speed and exposure—keep on reading to learn more about them.

AUTOEXPOSURE VS. MANUAL EXPOSURE

When shooting movies on the 60D, you have two options for exposure: Auto and Manual. When shooting in Auto, the camera determines all exposure settings (aperture, shutter speed, and ISO), whereas with Manual, you have control over these settings just as you would when shooting still images. Auto is a simple setting to use if you want to get a quick video and don’t have the time to change the settings manually. However, with autoexposure you have limited control, and if you want to take full advantage of your DSLR and lenses when shooting video, you’ll probably want to give the Manual mode a try.

The Manual mode for video functions in the same way as it does for still photography: You pick the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. You can even change your settings while you are recording (although the microphone might pick up camera noises— read more about audio later in this chapter). I prefer to use the Manual mode when shooting video because I like to have control over all of my settings, and I also like to use the largest aperture possible to decrease the depth of field in the scene.

One important thing to note when shooting video is that you have some shutter speed limitations, depending on your frames-per-second setting. The slowest shutter speed when shooting with a frame rate of 50 or 60 fps is 1/60 of a second, and for 24, 25, or 30 fps, you can go down to 1/30 of a second. You can’t go any faster than 1/4000 of a second, but it’s recommended that you keep your shutter speed between 1/30 and 1/125 of a second, especially when photographing a moving subject. The slower your shutter speed is, the smoother and less choppy the movement in your video will be.

CHANGING THE MOVIE EXPOSURE SETTING

CHANGING THE MOVIE EXPOSURE SETTING

  1. Set the camera to video mode using the Mode dial on the top of the camera.
  2. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to get to the first menu tab, and then select the Movie Exposure option at the top (A). Press the Set button.
  3. Make your selection (Auto or Manual), and then press the Set button once again to lock in your changes (B).

WHITE BALANCE AND PICTURE STYLES

When shooting video, you want to be sure to get the white balance right. Remember the difference between RAW and JPEG. Well, think of a video file as a JPEG. If you were to edit the video file on your computer, it would be difficult to change the white balance without damaging the pixels, and if the white balance is completely off, you might not even be able to salvage the video’s original colors.

What’s neat about shooting video is that you can see what the video quality will be like before you start recording. This means that you can set the white balance and see it changing right in front of you

Picture styles are also a very useful tool when shooting video. They work the same way as with still photography and you can preview your scene with the changes while in the video Live View mode. Just remember that once you record in one of these settings, you can’t change this quality of the video. For example, when using the Monochrome (black and white) picture style, once you’ve recorded a movie, there is no way to go back and retrieve the color information.