Canon EOS 60D, Picture Styles

Picture styles on the 60D will allow you to enhance your images in-camera depending on the type of photo you are taking. The picture style is automatically selected when you are using any of the Basic Zone modes. When using a Creative Zone shooting mode, you decide which style to use.

There are a few things to keep in mind when using picture styles. The first is that when you are shooting in RAW, the picture style doesn’t really “stick.” When previewing your images on the LCD Monitor, you’ll see it applied to the image; but once you bring it into your RAW editing software, you can change it to any of the other styles. Shooting JPEG images or video, however, will permanently embed the picture style to the image or movie and can’t be changed. This is extremely important to keep in mind when using styles such as the Monochrome picture style, since you will be discarding all color from your image.

These styles can be applied in the menu, while shooting in Live View, or while editing your RAW images in-camera. There are six styles to choose from, along with three additional user-defined styles:

  • Standard: This general-purpose style is used to create crisp images with bold, vibrant colors. It is suitable for most scenes.
  • Portrait: This style enhances the colors in skin tone, and is used for a softerlooking image.
  • Landscape: This style enhances blues and greens, two colors that are typically visible in a landscape image.
  • Neutral: This style creates natural colors and subdued images, and it is a good choice if you want to do a lot of editing to your photos on the computer.
  • Faithful: This picture style is similar to the neutral style but creates better color when shooting in daylight-balanced light (color temperature of 5200K). It’s also a good option if you prefer to edit your photos on the computer.
  • Monochrome: This style creates black and white images. It’s important to note that if you use the Monochrome style and shoot in JPEG, you cannot revert the image to color.

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE IN THE ME

  1. Press the Menu button on the back of the camera, and then use the Multi- Controller to get to the second menu tab.
  2. Using the Quick Control dial, scroll down to the Picture Style menu item. Press the Set button.
  3. Use either the Main dial or the Quick Control dial to scroll through the styles. When you’ve selected the one you want to use, press the Set button.
  4. To edit any of these styles, select the one you want to change, and then press the Info button. To edit a specific setting, select the setting, press Set, and then use the Quick Control dial to make the changes.

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE WITH LIVE VIEW

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE WITH LIVE VIEW

  1. Press the Live View shooting button to get into the Live View shooting mode.
  2. With Live View activated, press the Quick Control button on the back of the camera, and then use the Multi- Controller to scroll down to the Picture Style icon. Press Set.
  3. Use the Main dial on the top of the camera to select from among the different base picture style choices (A).
  4. Once you’ve selected a picture style, you can change any of its four parameters by using the Multi-Controller or Quick Control dial to select them (sharpness, contrast, saturation, and color tone), and then use the Main dial to make the changes (B).
  5. Press the Set button to lock in your changes.

 

Canon 7D, Exposure Settings for Video

Setting the exposure for video is similar to setting exposure for still photographs, but you will notice a few differences that will only apply when recording movies. One obvious difference is that you can only view your scene in Live View, and the LCD Monitor will display a simulated exposure for what your video will look like during the recording process. You’ll know it’s working properly when you see the exposure simulation icon displayed in white on the Information Display (Figure 9.4). There are also some limitations on shutter speed and exposure— keep on reading to learn more about them.

 In video mode you will see a simulated exposure that is similar to what you will actually record.
FIGURE 9.4 In video mode you will see a simulated exposure that is similar to what you will actually record.

AUTOEXPOSURE VS. MANUAL EXPOSURE

As with other types of photography, we have the option to shoot in auto or Manual mode (M), but with video the settings are a bit different. When using a shooting mode other than M (such as P, Tv, Av, and the Full Auto modes) the camera determines its exposure settings by using autoexposure. You have no control over the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. This is a simple setting to use if you want to get a quick video and don’t have the time to change the settings manually. However, with autoexposure you have limited control, and if you want to take full advantage of your DSLR and lenses when shooting video, you’ll probably want to give the Manual mode a try.

The Manual mode for video functions in the same way as it does for still photography: You pick the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. You can even change your settings while you are recording (although the microphone might pick up camera noises—read more about audio later in this chapter). I prefer to use the Manual mode when shooting video because I like to be in control over all of my settings, and I also like to use the largest aperture possible to decrease the depth of fi eld in the scene.

One important thing to note when shooting video is that you have some shutter speed limitations, depending on your frames-per-second setting. The slowest shutter speed when shooting with a frame rate of 50 or 60 fps is 1/60 of a second, and for 24, 25, or 30 fps you can go down to 1/30 of a second. You can’t go any faster than 1/4000 of a second, but it’s recommended that you keep your shutter speed between 1/30 and 1/125 of a second, especially when photographing a moving subject. The slower your shutter speed is, the smoother and less choppy the movement in your video will be.

WHITE BALANCE AND PICTURE STYLES

if you were to edit the video fi le on your computer, it would be diffi cult to change the white balance without damaging the pixels, and if the white balance is completely off, you might not even be able to salvage the video’s original colors.

What’s neat about shooting video is that you can see what the video quality will be like before you start recording. This means that you can set the white balance and see it changing right in front of you

Picture styles are also a very useful tool when shooting video. They work the same way as with still photography, and you can preview your scene with the changes while in the video Live View mode. Just remember that once you record in one of these settings, you can’t change this quality of the video. For example, when using the Monochrome (black and white) Picture Style, once you’ve recorded a movie, there is no way to go back and retrieve the color information.

 

Canon 7D, Selecting a White Balance and Picture Style

You’ll probably want to capture your image with a proper white balance, and with landscapes your options (such as the Daylight and Cloudy settings) are more straightforward than with some other types of photography. If you’re shooting in RAW, you have some leeway when selecting the white balance in-camera, because it’s easy to change it non-destructively after the fact. But my philosophy is that it’s always best to get things right in-camera.

Just because there is a “correct” white balance for each scene doesn’t necessarily mean that you need to stick with that setting. Try experimenting with different white balance settings to give your landscape images new looks. Changing the white balance in an image can even give the feel of photographing a landscape at different times of day (Figures 5.8 and 5.9).

WARM AND COOL COLOR TEMPERATURES

These two terms are used to describe the overall colorcast of an image. Reds and yellows are said to be warm, which is the look that you usually get from the late afternoon sun. Blue is usually the predominant color when talking about a cool cast.

I really like to use Live View to make changes to some of the settings, such as white balance. We discussed this feature in Chapter 1, but did you know that you can also use the same method to change your Picture Style settings? You may already realize that the likely picture style to use is Landscape, but maybe you want to try out some of the other styles or make detailed changes to their settings and see how it affects your image. Using Live View is an excellent way to preview those changes even before you take your fi rst shot.

FIGURE 5.8 This image was photographed at sunset with the “proper” white balance— in this case, the Daylight setting.
FIGURE 5.8 This image was photographed at sunset with the “proper” white balance— in this case, the Daylight setting.
FIGURE 5.9 Switching the white balance to Fluorescent creates the impression that this image was taken in the early hours of the morning.
FIGURE 5.9 Switching the white balance to Fluorescent creates the impression that this image was taken in the early hours of the morning.

USING LIVE VIEW TO PREVIEW DIFFERENT PICTURE STYLE SETTINGS

USING LIVE VIEW TO PREVIEW DIFFERENT PICTURE STYLE SETTINGS

  1. Make sure the Live View shooting button is set to the white camera, and then press the START/STOP button.
  2. With Live View activated, press the Picture Style Selection button to the left of the LCD Monitor.
  3. Use the Main dial on the top of the camera to select among the different base picture style choices (A).
  4. Once you’ve selected a picture style, you can change any of its four parameters by using the Quick Control dial to
    scroll among them (sharpness, contrast, saturation, and color tone). Once you’ve selected a parameter, use the Main dial to adjust its settings (B).
  5. Press the Set button to lock in your changes.

Canon 7D The Portrait Picture Style for Better Skin Tones

I discussed the different picture styles the 7D has to offer, and as you have probably guessed, the Portrait style is best for photographing people. The default Portrait settings give your images a softer look, but the neat thing about the styles in general is that you have the ability to change the settings to increase or decrease the amount of sharpness, contrast, saturation, and color tone to your preference.

SETTING THE PORTRAIT PICTURE STYLE

SETTING THE PORTRAIT PICTURE STYLE

  1. Wake the camera (if necessary) by lightly pressing the Shutter button.
  2. Press the Picture Style Selection button on the back of the camera (A).
  3. Use either the Main dial or the Quick Control dial to scroll through to the Portrait style (B).
  4. If you would like to make any changes to the style, press the INFO button and use the Multi-Controller or Quick Control dial to select the setting you would like to adjust (C). Then press the Set button and use the same dial to change the setting (D).
  5. Press the Set button to lock in this change, and then press the Menu button to go back to the Picture Style screen.

BEAUTIFUL BLACK AND WHITE PORTRAITS

Sometimes a portrait just looks better in black and white—we see more of the person and their expression rather than their surroundings or the color of their clothing (Figure 4.15). You can change the picture style to Monochrome in your camera so that you are photographing the image in black and white, but when you do this, you are only giving yourself one option. If you decide you liked it better in color, you
have no way to change it back.

I prefer to do all of my black and white conversions while editing the photo on my computer, and I encourage you to do the same. You can make black and white conversions, along with many other types of adjustments to your images, by using the Canon Digital Photo Professional software on the disc included with your camera.

A black and white portrait eliminates the distraction of color and puts all the emphasis on the subject.
FIGURE 4.15 A black and white portrait eliminates the distraction of color and puts all the emphasis on the subject.

 

Canon 7D CA: Creative Auto Mode

One good alternative for new photographers is to start out in the Creative Auto (CA) mode. It’s very similar to Full Auto, so it’s something you might want to use in moderation, but you do have a bit more control over some of the settings. You have the ability to change the brightness, background blurriness (aperture), and Picture Style of each image, along with your quality setting and drive mode. The camera will decide the rest for you. It’s a good option if you know what you want your image to look like but are still not familiar with how aperture and shutter speed function to properly expose your image. For example, if you know that you want to photograph a person with a blurred background, you can do this very easily in the Creative Auto setting (Figure 3.1). The camera will know where to set the aperture to give you the effect you want.

This mode is still limited because you are not able to change your white balance, ISO, focus point, and shutter speed. Keep reading to explore the more advanced shooting modes— this will ultimately give you full control over the images you create.

Creative Auto Mode

SETTING UP AND SHOOTING IN CREATIVE AUTO MODE

  1. Turn your camera on and turn the Mode dial to align “CA” with the indicator line.
  2. The display on the LCD will automatically turn on, allowing you to change some of your settings. To make changes, press the Quick Control button and use the Multi-Controller to toggle between the settings. Then use the Quick Control dial to make your adjustments.
  3. When you’ve fi nalized your settings, point the camera at your subject and press the Shutter button to take a photo.

MENU ITEMS IN AUTOMATIC MODES

The menu tabs are limited in the automatic shooting modes.

One important detail to know when using the Full Auto and Creative Auto modes is that your menu tabs are limited. Only seven out of the eleven tabs that are normally visible when shooting in all other mode settings will display (Figure 3.2). Because in fully automatic modes the camera decides the majority of the exposure and color settings, the information in some menu tabs is not necessary.