Canon EOS 60D, Picture Styles

Picture styles on the 60D will allow you to enhance your images in-camera depending on the type of photo you are taking. The picture style is automatically selected when you are using any of the Basic Zone modes. When using a Creative Zone shooting mode, you decide which style to use.

There are a few things to keep in mind when using picture styles. The first is that when you are shooting in RAW, the picture style doesn’t really “stick.” When previewing your images on the LCD Monitor, you’ll see it applied to the image; but once you bring it into your RAW editing software, you can change it to any of the other styles. Shooting JPEG images or video, however, will permanently embed the picture style to the image or movie and can’t be changed. This is extremely important to keep in mind when using styles such as the Monochrome picture style, since you will be discarding all color from your image.

These styles can be applied in the menu, while shooting in Live View, or while editing your RAW images in-camera. There are six styles to choose from, along with three additional user-defined styles:

  • Standard: This general-purpose style is used to create crisp images with bold, vibrant colors. It is suitable for most scenes.
  • Portrait: This style enhances the colors in skin tone, and is used for a softerlooking image.
  • Landscape: This style enhances blues and greens, two colors that are typically visible in a landscape image.
  • Neutral: This style creates natural colors and subdued images, and it is a good choice if you want to do a lot of editing to your photos on the computer.
  • Faithful: This picture style is similar to the neutral style but creates better color when shooting in daylight-balanced light (color temperature of 5200K). It’s also a good option if you prefer to edit your photos on the computer.
  • Monochrome: This style creates black and white images. It’s important to note that if you use the Monochrome style and shoot in JPEG, you cannot revert the image to color.

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE IN THE ME

  1. Press the Menu button on the back of the camera, and then use the Multi- Controller to get to the second menu tab.
  2. Using the Quick Control dial, scroll down to the Picture Style menu item. Press the Set button.
  3. Use either the Main dial or the Quick Control dial to scroll through the styles. When you’ve selected the one you want to use, press the Set button.
  4. To edit any of these styles, select the one you want to change, and then press the Info button. To edit a specific setting, select the setting, press Set, and then use the Quick Control dial to make the changes.

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE WITH LIVE VIEW

SETTING THE PICTURE STYLE WITH LIVE VIEW

  1. Press the Live View shooting button to get into the Live View shooting mode.
  2. With Live View activated, press the Quick Control button on the back of the camera, and then use the Multi- Controller to scroll down to the Picture Style icon. Press Set.
  3. Use the Main dial on the top of the camera to select from among the different base picture style choices (A).
  4. Once you’ve selected a picture style, you can change any of its four parameters by using the Multi-Controller or Quick Control dial to select them (sharpness, contrast, saturation, and color tone), and then use the Main dial to make the changes (B).
  5. Press the Set button to lock in your changes.

 

Canon EOS 60D, In-Camera Image Editing

The 60D has image-editing features that allow you to quickly process images in-camera and save those files as a JPEG on your SD card. This feature is not a replacement for editing images on your computer, but it is a useful and fun way to create quick, ready-to-use images directly from your memory card.

CREATIVE FILTERS

The Creative filters are a fun way to add different effects to your images. The 60D comes with four different filters, each with settings you can change to customize the look of your image. Now, one thing to note is that you are unable to apply these effects to images photographed in the mRAW or sRAW quality settings.

  • Grainy B/W: This will make the image black and white and also add grain to the image. You can control the amount of contrast in the image—the contrast setting in Figure 10.2 was set to “low.”
  • Soft Focus: This adds a classic “soft glow” to an image by adding blur (Figure 10.3). You have control over the amount of blur you would like to add to your image.
  • Toy Camera effect: This effect adds a color cast and also vignettes the corners of the image to make it look as though it was photographed with a toy camera (Figure 10.4).
  • Miniature effect: If you want to mimic the look of a tilt-shift lens, then this is really fun to use. This filter adds contrast and blur to the image to make your scene look like a diorama, and it allows you to select the area of focus. It looks best when applied to photos taken from high up, like from a cliff or balcony (Figure 10.5).
Grainy B/W
FIGURE 10.2 Grainy B/W
Soft Focus
FIGURE 10.3 Soft Focus
Toy Camera effect
FIGURE 10.4 Toy Camera effect
Miniature effect
FIGURE 10.5 Miniature effect

APPLYING A CREATIVE FILTER TO AN IMAGE

APPLYING A CREATIVE FILTER TO AN IMAGE

  1. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to go to the fifth tab from the left. Scroll down to the Creative Filters option using the Quick Control dial and press Set (A).
  2. Use the Quick Control dial to select an image to edit (your camera will only display compatible images at this point). Press the Set button.
  3. Use the Quick Control dial to select the Creative filter you would like to apply, and then press Set (B).
  4. Use the Quick Control dial to adjust the filter (the options are different for each filter) (C). When you are finished editing, press the Set button. (You can also exit any of the filters at any time by pressing the Menu button to go to the previous screen.)
  5. Select OK on the next screen, and your image is now saved as a JPEG on your memory card. Press OK to confirm, and press the Menu button to exit.

RAW PROCESSING

Along with the Creative filters, you can also do basic adjustments to RAW files on your 60D. This feature is helpful if you need to quickly edit a file and save it as a JPEG, and you don’t have access or time to do so on a computer. Just like with the Creative filters, you cannot process images photographed in the mRAW and sRAW quality settings.

PROCESSING RAW IMAGES WITH THE 60D

PROCESSING RAW IMAGES WITH THE 60D

  1. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to go to the fifth tab from the left. Scroll down to the RAW Image Processing option using the Quick Control dial, and press Set (A).
  2. Use the Quick Control dial to select an image to edit (your camera will only display compatible images at this point). Press the Set button.
  3. Use the Multi-Controller to select an option to edit. Then use the Quick Control dial to make changes.
  4. Continue making changes to each setting as necessary, and when you are finished processing the image, scroll down to the Save option (B). Press Set.
  5. Select OK on the next screen, and your image is now saved as a JPEG on your memory card. Press OK to confirm, and press the Menu button to exit.

RESIZING IMAGES

Sometimes you might want to quickly resize an image, and the 60D has a feature that makes this very easy. You can resize JPEG L/M/S1 and S2 images, but not RAW and JPEG S3 files. This feature is perfect if you edited an image using a Creative filter discussed earlier in this section and need to use the image on the Web or send it as an email attachment.

RESIZING IMAGES ON THE 60D

RESIZING IMAGES ON THE 60D

  1. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to go to the fifth tab from the left. Scroll down to the Resize option using the Quick Control dial and press Set (A).
  2. Use the Quick Control dial to select an image to resize (your camera will only display compatible images at this point). Press the Set button.
  3. Use the Quick Control dial to select the size you would like your image to be, and then press the Set button (B).
  4. Select OK on the next screen, and your image is now saved as a JPEG on your memory card. Press OK to confirm, and press the Menu button to exit.

 

VARI-ANGLE LCD MONITOR

One really cool feature of the 60D is its Vari-angle LCD Monitor (commonly called an “articulating screen”), which can be really handy in certain situations. Benefits of using this feature are very apparent when shooting in Live View or video mode, since you can angle the display so that it’s shaded from the sun. You can also angle the display when you want to lower or raise the camera beyond your field of view by moving the LCD Monitor so that it’s always facing in your direction. You can also swivel the display so that it’s flipped completely around, making it possible to do self-portraits or videos of yourself.

Another nice benefit of the Vari-angle LCD Monitor is that you can turn the display so that it’s flush against the camera, protecting the LCD Monitor from scratches while not in use. This is a good option when packing the camera in a camera bag or while using it in a harsh environment where damage to the monitor can easily occur.

VARI-ANGLE LCD MONITOR

Canon EOS 60D Balancing Your Image with the Electronic Level

Finding the horizon and making sure your camera is level is sometimes easier said than done. Photographing a flat landscape is one thing, but when you integrate mountains, rolling hills, and foliage into the image, you might not be able to see where the horizon line is, and you risk tilting your camera in one direction or the other.

Many tripods and tripod heads come with a bubble level, but there will be times that your tripod is propped at a weird angle and you won’t be able to rely on it. The 60D has a really cool feature—called the electronic level—that can help you with this. When the electronic level is activated, you can set the horizontal tilt and properly level your camera for landscape photography. You also have the option of viewing this feature on the LCD Monitor, through the viewfinder, or on the top LCD Panel (Figures 5.10 and 5.11). I usually prefer using the LCD Monitor, especially when my camera is on a tripod, but sometimes I don’t want to take my eyes away from the viewfinder (which could slow down my shooting). In those situations, I use the viewfinder method.

FIGURE 5.10 You can view the electronic level in the LCD Monitor. This feature is available whether or not Live View is on (in this example, Live View is off).
FIGURE 5.10 You can view the electronic level in the LCD Monitor. This feature is available whether or not Live View is on (in this example, Live View is off).
FIGURE 5.11 You can also view the electronic level through the viewfinder. In this example, the hash marks that you see indicate that the camera is not level on the horizon. The indicator on the top LCD Panel shows these same hash marks on the bottom of the panel.
FIGURE 5.11 You can also view the electronic level through the viewfinder. In this example, the hash marks that you see indicate that the camera is not level on the horizon. The indicator on the top LCD Panel shows these same hash marks on the bottom of the panel.

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE LCD MONITOR

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE LCD MONITOR

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE LCD MONITOR

  1. First, be sure that you have the electronic level set up to display properly. To do so, press the Menu button and use the Main dial to select the third setup tab, and then scroll down to Info Button Display Options using the Quick
    Control dial (A). Press the Set button.
  2. Make sure that there is a check mark next to the Electronic Level setting (B). If there isn’t, use the Quick Control dial to scroll to it, and then press the Set button (a check mark should appear). Use the Quick Control dial again to scroll down to OK, and then press Set.
  3. Next, press the Info button until the electronic level appears in the LCD Monitor. (To view the electronic level when using Live View, press the Info button until it appears in the LCD Monitor.) You’ll know the horizontal tilt is leveled when the red lines turn green (C).

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE VIEWFINDER AND TOP LCD PANEL

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE VIEWFINDER AND TOP LCD PANEL

  1. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to scroll to the Custom Functions tab, and then use the Quick Control dial to highlight the C.Fn IV: Operation/Others item (A). Press the Set button.
  2. Use the Quick Control dial to select C.Fn IV-2. Press the Set button and use the Main dial to get to the fifth menu option (B). Press Set.
  3. Now, look through the viewfinder as if you are going to take a photo, halfpress the Shutter button to activate the camera, and then press the Set button. On the bottom of the display you’ll see hash marks moving from left to right. When just one hash mark is showing, your camera is leveled horizontally.

Canon 7D, Balancing Your Image with the Electronic Level

Finding the horizon and making sure your camera is level is sometimes easier said than done. Photographing a fl at landscape is one thing, but when you integrate mountains, rolling hills, and foliage into the image, you might not be able to see where the horizon line is, and you risk tilting your camera in one direction or the other.

Many tripods and tripod heads come with a bubble level, but there will be times that your tripod is propped at a weird angle and you won’t be able to rely on it. The 7D has a really cool feature—called the electronic level—that can help you out with this. When the electronic level is activated, you can set the vertical and horizontal tilt and properly level your camera for landscape photography. You also have the option of viewing this feature either on the LCD Monitor or through the viewfi nder (Figures 5.10 and 5.11). I usually prefer using the LCD Monitor, especially when my camera is on a tripod, but sometimes I don’t want to take my eyes away from the viewfi nder (which could slow down my shooting). In those situations, I use the viewfi nder method.

FIGURE 5.10 You can view the electronic level in the LCD Monitor. This feature is available whether or not Live View is on (in this example, Live View is off).
FIGURE 5.10 You can view the electronic level in the LCD Monitor. This feature is available whether or not Live View is on (in this example, Live View is off).
FIGURE 5.11 You can also view the electronic level through the viewfi nder. In this example, the AF points that you see indicate that the camera is level horizontally and tilted upward vertically.
FIGURE 5.11 You can also view the electronic level through the viewfi nder. In this example, the AF points that you see indicate that the camera is level horizontally and tilted upward vertically.

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE LCD MONITOR

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE LCD MONITOR

  1. First be sure that you have the electronic level set up to display properly. To do so, press the Menu button and
    use the Main dial to select the third setup tab, then scroll down to INFO Button Display Options using the Quick Control dial (A). Press the Set button.
  2. Make sure that there is a check mark next to the Electronic Level setting (B). If there isn’t, use the Quick Control dial to scroll to it and then press the Set button (a check mark should appear). Use the Quick Control dial again to scroll down to OK, and then press Set.
  3. Next, press the INFO button until the electronic level appears in the LCD Monitor. (To view the electronic level when using Live View, press the INFO button until it appears in the LCD Monitor.) You’ll know the horizontal and vertical tilt are leveled when the red lines turn green (C).

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE VIEWFINDER

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE VIEWFINDER

  1. Press the Menu button and use the Main dial to scroll to the Custom Functions tab, and then use the Quick Control dial to highlight the C.Fn IV: Operation/Others item (A). Press the Set button.
  2. Use the Quick Control dial to select C.Fn IV-1 (Custom Controls). Press the Set button and use the Main dial to highlight the M-Fn item (B). Press Set.
  3. Scroll over to the VF Electronic Level item (C). Press Set to lock in your change.SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE VIEWFINDER
  4. Now, look through the viewfi nder as if you are going to take a photo. Press the M-Fn button (located next to the Shutter button). A grid will appear and you’ll see black or red squares where your AF points usually appear. You’ll know that the camera is level both vertically and horizontally when the only AF point visible is the one in the center (D). To exit from this mode, just press the Shutter button halfway.

SETTING THE ELECTRONIC LEVEL IN THE VIEWFINDER