Canon EOS 60D, Depth of Field

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Selective focusing with a wide aperture can add a lot of creativity to your images. You are telling the viewer where you want the focus of the image to be, and the meaning and story change depending on what is in focus. Using a telephoto lens can compress your background even more, decreasing the depth of field and making the background or foreground even blurrier. But take into consideration that just because your background or foreground is blurry, it doesn’t mean you can’t show detail in those areas (Figure 8.1).

A wide aperture and a long lens were used in this image to create a blurred background; the man in the background is still fully visible, even though the focus is on the woman.
FIGURE 8.1 A wide aperture and a long lens were used in this image to create a blurred background; the man in the background is still fully visible, even though the focus is on the woman.

If you wanted the entire image to be in focus, you would use a smaller aperture. Images with great depth of field, such as a landscape or an image with a lot of detail, direct the viewer to look at the entire scene (Figure 8.2).

BOKEH

The term “bokeh” (pronounced “boh-keh”) refers to the out-of-focus area in an image, or the aesthetic quality of the blur. Different lenses will result in different qualities of bokeh, and it is usually more visible in images with very shallow depth of field.

In order to capture all the details in this image, I used a small aperture so that the majority of the scene was in focus.
FIGURE 8.2 In order to capture all the details in this image, I used a small aperture so that the majority of the scene was in focus.