Nikon D7000, Classic Black-and-White Portraits

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There is something timeless about a black-and-white portrait. It eliminates the distraction of color and puts all the emphasis on the subject. To get great black-andwhites without having to resort to any image-processing software, set your picture control to Monochrome (Figure 6.10).

The picture controls are automatically applied when shooting with the JPEG file format. If you are shooting in RAW, the picture that shows up on your rear LCD display will look black and white, but it will appear as a color image when you open it in your software. You can use the software to apply Monochrome, or any other picture control, to your RAW image within the image-editing software.

The real key to using the Monochrome picture control is to customize it for your portrait subject. The control can be changed to alter the sharpness and contrast. For women, children, puppies, or anyone else you want to look somewhat soft, set the Sharpness setting to 0 or 1. For old cowboys, longshoremen, and anyone else who you want to look really detailed, including the wrinkles, try a setting of 6 or 7. I typically like to leave Contrast at a setting of around –1 or –2. This gives me a nice range of tones throughout the image.

The other adjustment that you should try is to change the picture control’s Filter effect from None to one of the four available settings (Yellow, Orange, Red, and Green). Using the filters will have the effect of either lightening or darkening the skin tones. The Red and Yellow filters usually lighten skin, while the Green filter can make skin appear a bit darker. Experiment to see which one works best for your subject.

Getting high-quality black-and-white portraits is as simple as setting the picture control to Monochrome.
Figure 6.10 Getting high-quality black-and-white portraits is as simple as setting the picture control to Monochrome.