Canon EOS 60D Camera Modes and Exposure

Must Read

4 Reasons NOT to Refinance Your Home

It is no secret that mortgage interest rates are at historically low levels, leading many homeowners to consider refinancing...

Components

If you use the Flex framework, try the Tour de Flex application (see Figure 18-4). It is a good...

The Science of PPC

The next chapter covers the mechanics of PPC, but for now it’s important to understand that successful direct-response advertising...

Student Loans – How to Get Your Share of the Billion Dollar Federal Funding Reserves

Student Loans are imperative this day and age; especially when considering the fact that an average year at a...

Federal Student Loan Consolidation for Teachers

The average teaching student graduates with over $18,000.00 in student loan debt. After interest is added you could be...

Home Equity Loans vs Home Equity Line of Credit – Which Option Should You Choose?

Tapping into your home equity loans qualifies you for low rates with the potential benefit of tax write offs....
Admin
test

When photographing traditional landscapes, you’ll most likely want the entire scene to be in focus. To achieve this, you will need to use a small aperture to get great depth of field (Figure 5.2). You could always set your camera to Av mode (Aperture Priority) and set your aperture at around f/11 or f/16, but because the camera chooses the shutter speed, it could vary, changing the look of your image. To prevent this, consider using Manual mode.

Just as with all other styles of photography, if you want to be in control of your images, you should select a shooting mode that allows you that control. Once you are set up and ready to shoot, the light in your scene probably won’t change drastically in a short period of time, so your exposure will stay consistent as well. Shooting in Manual mode will ensure that you get the look you want, because you will have full control over both shutter speed and aperture.

FIGURE 5.2 This image was photographed at a very small aperture to ensure that the details in both the foreground and background were in focus.
FIGURE 5.2 This image was photographed at a very small aperture to ensure that the details in both the foreground and background were in focus.

Now, just because most landscapes are photographed with great depth of field doesn’t mean you always have to photograph your images the same way (Figure 5.3). There’s no “right way” to do any one thing, so feel free to break the rules and try something new.

FIGURE 5.3 I used a wide aperture and focused on the flowers in the foreground to give the image shallow depth of field.
FIGURE 5.3 I used a wide aperture and focused on the flowers in the foreground to give the image shallow depth of field.

 

 

Latest News

Digital Marketing for Beginners

Digital marketing for starter, Let to basic learning about connecting with your audience in the right place at the...

More Articles Like This