Canon EOS 60D, Point of View

Must Read

Government Debt Consolidation Programs – How Can Obama’s Bailout Plan and Debt Relief Programs Help?

Good news has just been announced to American citizens, especially those whose total debt amount has surpassed ten thousand...

Business Blogging – You travel on the train?

If you have a business, you should have a blog. This applies regardless of whether your business is online...

The Code-Behind

Listing 2.2 contains the code-behind, which must handle all the special features of this flashlight—strobe mode, SOS mode, and...
Admin
test

One thing I love about photography is that I get to show the world what I see, and it’s always fun to try photographing a subject from a different point of view to see what I can create. You don’t have to change your perspective drastically to get results—sometimes you can capture a great image simply by moving yourself up or down a few feet (Figures 8.10 and 8.11). Not only will you be looking at the subject from a different perspective, but your background will also change, sometimes for the better. Try moving up and down when taking photos to see what kind of results you can get.

This image of the inside of a church before a wedding was taken from a standing position.
FIGURE 8.10 This image of the inside of a church before a wedding was taken from a standing position.

Moving down a few feet and photographing the same scene from my knees changed the look of the entire bottom half of the image and is an improvement from the first photo. Notice that the back wall in the image doesn’t change from Figure 8.10 to this one.
FIGURE 8.11 Moving down a few feet and photographing the same scene from my knees changed the look of the entire bottom half of the image and is an improvement from the first photo. Notice that the back wall in the image doesn’t change from Figure 8.10 to this one.

Giving your images a different perspective can also change the dynamics of the image (Figure 8.12). By getting in close, you bring the viewer into the scene so they feel as if they’re experiencing the moment along with you.

I got in close to photograph this staged riot to make my viewers feel as if they were a part of it.
FIGURE 8.12 I got in close to photograph this staged riot to make my viewers feel as if they were a part of it.

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest News

Underlight As Accent, For Power and The Main Light for Photography

Underlighting, in which fill or accent light comes from under the topic, is not widely used technique in the traditional Portraits,...

How To Fix Overexposure As A Creative Tool, The Complete Guide

As an creative tool, overexposure is sort of underrated. What I’m close to propose could be a deliberate and well thought out technique for...

7D Mark II is Canon’s best DSLR cameras without full-frame sensor.

The expected long-awaited Canon EOS 7D Mark II are shipping in November for $ 1,799 without a lens. With a higher price tag, you...

Low key photography and How to isolate your subject.

Low key photography doesn’t depend on underexposure to make its point; the key to low key is that the majority of tones, even correctly...

High Key Lighting Techniques for Professional Photographers

I’ve written many times about high key lighting techniques and how to achieve them. The term “high key” is a bit misleading. As I’ve...

More Articles Like This